Posts Tagged ‘writer’

Blunders have Payday

January 12, 2009

Failures are the horrible effects of blunders – professional or ethical – accumulated over times. As financial crises ripple across presses in America so every nation whose press follows that failure pattern will necessary come to grief.The Nigerian press is no exception.
It’s no news again that the American Tribune and other big -time American newspapers are declaring bankruptcy and folding up. ABC and other broadcast stations are also downsizing unprecedentedly. The
surviving ones are pinning their hopes on Obama – maybe his government might interest Americans and change their perceptions of the media. Americans – just as Nigerians –are tired of the press, its poor performance of the information role.
Simply put, these media houses would survive if the Obama government changed journalism in America. What a shame.

Online Journalism
However, there is a thriving brand of journalism that takes the biscuit now.Its growing in leaps and bounds. It’s credible and full of human interests. No gatekeeping. No censoring. No praise singing. It’s blogging – citizen journalism – online
journalism. It’s everywhere, even in the most repressive China, Kenya, Egypt and Algeria.
The tide is gradually changing, too, in Nigeria, especially as more people become cyber-savvy. More than 8 million people now use the internet in Nigeria. The well informed ones go online to select – free of charge – the information they need.
Nigerians are tired of paying N150 to read obituaries, adverts placed by hopeless employment agencies, dead-dry news, sponsored columns, wired news with no local angles.
There’s no reporting again in the Nigerian press.Everybody is a columnist or writer.And when reporting, five reporters – shallow reporters – cluster round a dog-bites-man story of five paragraphs,using shoddy tie-backs to add boringdetails to the story.Samsung, Sound City, Kenny Music and reality shows have taken over the broadcast stations too.
Stories of corruption, government profligate spending,and bad governance go unreported -sometimes reported superficially.
Investigative reporting is dead. The editors cram the pages or screen with trivia.
This is the failure pattern. It’s graphically manifest.

But thanks to citizen journalism. It offers us what traditional journalism cannot – for fear or favour.
Where else can one get the kind of scoop SaharaReporters dishes out daily? What about its investigative style? And the caliber of its columnists? And yet its free.
Already, there are many others competing with the online versions of the newspapers and magazines in Nigeria.
Let’s see in half a decade from now. Some newspapers and mags will die naturally. Readers will go online, and choose what they read.They can also contribute in whatever form they like. Then the Nigerian Guild of Editors,the Nigerian Union of Journalists will be jobless as their profit-conscious media owners go belly-up.

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Again,Sun Inconsistent

January 5, 2009

The January 3 edition of The Sun News published an essay – they
call it a report,another blunder – in which the essayist took a
puritan look at pornography, homosexuality, and other erotic
vices in Lagos.

The report was more of a preachment scripted by a well catechized catholic,but poorly attributed to Cardinal Anthony Olubunmi Okogie of the Catholic Church in Lagos.

It feels like The Sun newshounds have no clear editorial policies. Any stuff goes.Or there are editorial policies nobody cares about when writing. So the Naija Sun house is divided.

Obscenity
Both online and offline, this tabloid splashes titillating pictures of oily thighs and breasts of scantily clothed, ambitious girls on their Sun Girl page.
Now you’re already debating what constitutes pornography, obscenity and related legal knots in journalism. Ditch it.
That’s no point now.
Those Sun girls , man ,are out for business.Their ambition is made of stuff sterner than Jessica Simpson’s and Kadnarsha’s. You know those Esquire cover girls that bare all at ease?
This Sun girl page not only sells the newspaper to those randy voyeurs as a fetish, it also skillfully promotes what that parochial essay writer was castigating.

Again , dive into The Sun archive. You sure come up with a particular column – Intimate. It’s written by Juliana Francis , a devil-may-care gutter pressman. She spills out her smutty heart in so daring a way you’d have to convince yourself you’re
reading The Sun and not Scarlet or Hint.
Whatever inspired them now to throw the first stone?

No Principles
I suppose The Sun needs some washed-up pen-pushers to school its editorial staff in ethical journalism. Its raw journalists haven’t realized their muses are subject to their own – or their paymaster’s – ideals and views which they must strive to project coherently; they just scribble any trash and pass it up for publication.
No ideals. No absolutes.No nothing .Uh?
Are they libertarian? Nah.
Libertarians still stand for something – a well defined nothing ,at least.

If transcribing every jabber or prosing every incoherent fib of one’s imagination – as The SUN does – is journalism, then a cute kindergarten brat is a journalist – The Sun type.
Got what ‘am saying?

Naija Columnists Manque

December 30, 2008

I read through some ‘TimesofNigeria.com’ today. The writer was
reviewing a number of political columns , the writers and their
blunders – ideological and academic.
The guy was so unsparing in his spankings that I actually felt
he went overboard in the critical review.
I guess I like that, anyhow.

The highest point of his belly-ache with the Nigerian media is
the ego-trip and mediocrity of the likes of Dele Momodu of
Ovation diving headfirst into political pontification.
Dele, an ambitious Yoruba Language graduate from Obafemi
Awolowo University, Ife, accidentally found fame and fortune,
in yellow journalism and publicity.
But how much of a political punditry can we expect from a
circumstantial journalist, a wining and dining one like him?

From time immemorial, I’ve never reckoned with Dele Momodu,
in particular, as a professional journalist. Or his gold- plated
broadsheet as a serious journal. So I can’t figure out whatever
political theories or divide he belongs let alone writes for as
intelligibly as expected of a political journalist.

Francis,the reviewer, should have realized that Nigeria’s political journalists are
products of an unfocused , inconsistent nation. You should
expect such political blunders and ideological daydreaming
from the columnists manque you just reviewed.

And these blunders,if you ask me,will grow worse,and the unprofessionalism will eat deeper into the nigerian media till his kingdom come except Nigeria and her
aging think-tanks are able to stand for something – something
definite – something every Nigerian can sympathise with,
and clutch at tenaciously.
It might not necessarily be the hip thing. It could be stupid,
but let it be methodic.